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Last Visit: 07/29/2014 01:53PM
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bhouse46  
distinguished member(1218)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
Photo Journal Current Donor
02/16/2012 06:39PM
 
I remember getting tips on how to select a campsite when I first went in and picking up a few pointers along the way. All the tips were tied to conditions. An east facing site will allow morning sun to dry things of so they can pack for early travel and give afternoon shade. A north point has best chance of wind if the bugs are bad.

I am curious if these tips are based in fact or legend and to pick up some tips you folks have found worthy of passing on.
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WhiteWolf  
distinguished member(2662)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
1 trip report(s) Photo Journal Current Donor
02/16/2012 10:03PM
 
Campsites on the east side of medium to large lakes can be crap shoot. Gorgeous sunset views etc,,,, but can really battle the wind and be windbound on those days with a strong westerly wind. I tend to try avoid them as experience has shown the wind to win out as other sites have nearly just as good scenery.





The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.
BeaV  
distinguished member (439)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
Photo Journal Current Donor
02/17/2012 12:07PM
 
The only thing I have to add is that I usually seek a more sheltered (wooded) site in the cooler seasons of spring and fall. You don't want to be on an exposed rock campsite if it's cool, wet, windy, or a combo of these conditions.


During the hot season, I want some shade from tall nearby trees.
tom m  
distinguished member(541)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
Photo Journal Past Donor
02/17/2012 01:28PM
 
I always want to see the water just sitting around the camp


TOM
jamotrade  
distinguished member(1154)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
3 trip report(s) Photo Journal Past Donor
02/17/2012 02:15PM
 
A site on the north side of the lake is alway preferable in the early or late aeason since the sun will be on your site the longest.
PineKnot  
distinguished member(1315)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
4 trip report(s) Photo Journal
02/17/2012 07:06PM
 
Gotta have pines....preferably lots of big red or white ones with soft duff....and a breeze is nice to help keep the bugs at bay....


Do what you can, with what you have, where you are -- Teddy Roosevelt
busse56557  
member (14)member
02/17/2012 09:17PM
 
Awesome walleye fishing right next to camp or from shore. If you see a camper at a really small/rough site and it's early in the day, there's a reason they're staying there. Or solitude, I love going to the bwca and not seeing another person for days.
Kevlar  
distinguished member(2568)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
3 trip report(s) Photo Journal Past Donor
02/18/2012 08:59PM
 
Many times somebody made the good choice before you, and the site is taken. So...take the site that is open. If you have choices, apply the criteria mentioned above. I try to take sites that I cannot easily be windbound in. During buggy times, I like some breeze, however. But...be careful what you ask for!


Field glasses can sometimes save you a long paddle to an occupied campsite.
Scout64  
distinguished member(874)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
Photo Journal Current Donor Gear Reviews
02/19/2012 02:21PM
 
I always look for a site that is back in the trees with an open point. The tents are sheltered and the point allows you to catch a breeze and enjoy the sun.


"Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit."
Corsair  
distinguished member(1635)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
3 trip report(s) Photo Journal Current Donor Gear Reviews
02/19/2012 02:28PM
 
I always shoot for the island sites first. Less chance of visitors :)


My first criteria is tent pads. The amount and quality you are looking for depends on the size of your group. (number of tents)


I am a summer tripper, I love westward facing sites for the sunsets. (usually a sleep at sunrise). Keeps the skeeters down.


Gear can be damp in the morning, but we usually get to our next site in early afternoon to allow for drying of wet gear.


"Pack lightly, Tread lightly"
Corsair  
distinguished member(1635)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
3 trip report(s) Photo Journal Current Donor Gear Reviews
02/19/2012 02:28PM
 




"Pack lightly, Tread lightly"
mjmkjun  
distinguished member(1140)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
Current Donor
02/19/2012 04:55PM
 
1. I'd rather watch sunrise than sunset as I'm always up before dawn and most often asleep by dark.
2. No heavy undergrowth closing-in firegrate area.
Everything else I can make do.
boonie  
distinguished member(5687)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
2 trip report(s) Photo Journal Current Donor
02/19/2012 07:55PM
 
First, no bear sign; second, check the latrine. After that, like Corsair, I look for a good tent pad - I prefer grass, but level is more important. I personally like elevated sites for the view, even if I have to carry everything up there.


As others said, the direction it faces depends on the wind and the season as well as personal preference.
vinnie  
distinguished member (303)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
2 trip report(s) Photo Journal Current Donor
02/20/2012 07:52AM
 
If it's unoccupied it works for me
I-Hawk  
distinguished member (191)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
Photo Journal Past Donor
02/20/2012 09:17AM
 
Since I spend limited time canoeing I look for campsites out of the wind. The east or southern sites are always my first picks to provide protection from the winds. Fishing is important to me so I want access to water even on the windy days. I like a sheltered tent site with bid pines and decent kitchen.
smokedwhitefish  
member (23)member
Photo Journal
02/20/2012 09:24AM
 
In theory sites located in lower/swampy areas will experience more skeeters than sites on high rock faces or sites surrounded by tall wooded hills. I always try to avoid sites near the white lowlands on my Mackenzie maps.

PS- Tent pads have always been my first concern, but I'm hoping to make that a worry of the past this year with my new BB Warbonnet hammock.


"The world we've made scares the hell out of me. But there's still a little bit of heaven in there, and I want to show it due respect." ~Greg Brown: Eugene
bwcadan  
distinguished member(637)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
Photo Journal Current Donor
02/21/2012 10:10PM
 
A Thermarest tied to a cot can make a good site out of one without enough pads No slipping or worry about uneven ground, rocks, and sticks..


the greatest come backs are reserved for those with the greatest deficits.
FoxRiverRat  
distinguished member (146)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
03/01/2012 01:05PM
 
for the bear check are you just looking for scat and clawed up tree trunks?
boonie  
distinguished member(5687)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
2 trip report(s) Photo Journal Current Donor
03/01/2012 07:14PM
 
quote FoxRiverRat: "for the bear check are you just looking for scat and clawed up tree trunks?"


Yeah, basically, or chewed up food packs, packaging, body parts ;).
overthehill  
distinguished member(3530)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
1 trip report(s) Photo Journal Past Donor Gear Reviews
03/01/2012 07:39PM
 
quote vinnie: "If it's unoccupied it works for me"


Same here. A couple times (if the empty camp was not so hot), one canoe started to unload while scouts were sent around the bend with binoculars to see if option #2 was occupied). Depending on what time of year and how popular the area is; the time of day dictates our urgency.


Not to Hurry-Not to Worry
tnthekids  
distinguished member (225)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
3 trip report(s) Photo Journal Gear Reviews
03/05/2012 03:52PM
 
Things I check:
Good bear hang options
No lightening trees (extremely tall, lonely trees sticking above others)
Lat in good repair
Good tent pad (no overhanging limbs, fairly level surface
Place for shelter in case of bad weather
A good landing is a bonus


"It's never too late to be who you might have been." – George Eliot
walllee  
distinguished member(2182)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
2 trip report(s) Photo Journal Past Donor Gear Reviews
03/05/2012 06:12PM
 
I try to find a sight that is sheltered from wind swept areas of the lake. My main goal is fishing, so I need a spot that I will not be forced to stay at camp on windy days. I also like a area that has a great view of the lake. I also look for an area that will have a little breeze to keep mosquitoes at bay in the summertime. It is also a plus to be able to view the sunsets.
ZaraSp00k  
distinguished member(752)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
03/07/2012 05:27PM
 
quote bhouse46: An east facing site will allow morning sun to dry things of so they can pack for early travel


all depends on what you mean by early, and how wet the gear
housty9  
distinguished member(1122)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
Photo Journal Current Donor
03/08/2012 08:02AM
 
I look for a site that has fishing and not to open, has to have some cover.


our we there yet
nofish  
distinguished member(1016)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
1 trip report(s)
03/08/2012 10:01AM
 
What I consider my ideal campsite will change drastically based on how tired I am and how bad the weather is.

If its storming and I need to get off the lake or if I'm completely tired out then any site will look like the Hilton.

If I have the time and energy to scout a little for the best site then I look for a few things.

1. Good tent pads - a good nights sleep can make or break a trip
2. Tree - places to hang tarp, places to hang food, and no widow makers
3. Wind - I'd like some breeze to keep the bugs off and to keep cool on a hot day but I also want a protected area to land the canoe. Campsites on points are perfect for this. Catch a breeze from multiple directions but you can go to either side of the point to launch or land a canoe.
4. Views - I'd like a good view but really every where you look is a good view in the BWCA, its just a matter of what view you like better.

A decent set of binoculars will also save you a fair amount of paddling when scouting sites, well worth the extra weight. My wife was questioning me when she saw me packing them for our first trip together. She didn't see any reason to bring them, she thought I was going bird watching or something. When we were scouting campsites in the wind she saw pretty quickly why I brought them. I could position the canoe out of the wind and quickly scout a bunch of sites on the opposite shoreline to see if they were occupied which saved us a bunch of paddling. For this reason I also leave something brightly colored out hanging near the shoreline so people can see from a distance that the site is occupied. Hoping to save people a little paddling if i can.
Kots  
senior member (76)senior membersenior member
Photo Journal Current Donor
04/21/2012 08:00PM
 
The first things I always look for is enough tent sites and a kick-ass fire pit! You will be spending a lot of time around the fire, so its nice to have a great view...


When I die, sprinkle my ashes in the BWCA!
carmike  
distinguished member (469)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
2 trip report(s) Photo Journal
04/21/2012 11:34PM
 
I like a good exposed point...with a tent pad that's somewhat sheltered. I'll also take an overly exposed site to one that's overly sheltered. Wind is more often than not a good thing for me...I'll take a windy paddle out (of course, being wind-blown sucks) over a safe paddle that's from a "stagnant" campsite.
oldgentleman  
distinguished member(2570)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
6 trip report(s) Photo Journal Current Donor Gear Reviews
04/22/2012 06:58AM
 
Gotta agree with Kots. The area around the fire pit is what makes the site. Ample seating, big pines and a good view of the water.


Second, good hanging tree. (for our food, as long as nobody annoys us)
A couple decent tent pads, preferably sheltered and shaded.
timhutson1  
distinguished member (129)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
Photo Journal
04/22/2012 10:02AM
 
quote Kots: "The first things I always look for is enough tent sites and a kick-ass fire pit! You will be spending a lot of time around the fire, so its nice to have a great view..."


Agreed, a nice fire pit, and a place to rig a tarp over it. Near/on the water is also key.
RaisedByBears99  
distinguished member(524)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
04/22/2012 02:13PM
 
quote bhouse46: "I remember getting tips on how to select a campsite when I first went in and picking up a few pointers along the way. All the tips were tied to conditions. An east facing site will allow morning sun to dry things of so they can pack for early travel and give afternoon shade. A north point has best chance of wind if the bugs are bad.


I am curious if these tips are based in fact or legend and to pick up some tips you folks have found worthy of passing on."



Summer: High western exposure site with a rock peninsula to deal with bugs and heat.


Spring winter autumn: tight protected site with an eastern exposure to protect from wind.
BWfishingfanatic12  
senior member (87)senior membersenior member
3 trip report(s) Photo Journal
04/22/2012 03:14PM
 
Its usually just my brother and I so we can make do with whatever tent pads the site has to offer. A nice big fire area is what makes it for us. So, nice seating, a little bit of open space is nice, but you also need your good bear bad tree as well. We really love fishing so slip bobber fishing from campus is a big bonus and thats usually off of points or island sites so thats what we try to get if we can.
Savage Voyageur  
distinguished member(8613)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberpower member
Photo Journal Current Donor Gear Reviews
04/22/2012 03:16PM
 
I like a campsite that has some good trees for my hammock, after the blowdown it has been hard on some sites to find trees. Good fire ring and a cooking area is nice, landing not too rocky, food hanging trees, Fishing from camp.


"So many lakes, so little time."
bwcadan  
distinguished member(637)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
Photo Journal Current Donor
04/23/2012 10:50AM
 
High and dry is best.


the greatest come backs are reserved for those with the greatest deficits.
knightwxc5000  
member (9)member
04/23/2012 07:56PM
 
quote carmike: "I like a good exposed point...with a tent pad that's somewhat sheltered. I'll also take an overly exposed site to one that's overly sheltered. Wind is more often than not a good thing for me...I'll take a windy paddle out (of course, being wind-blown sucks) over a safe paddle that's from a "stagnant" campsite. "


This.


I like a site with a lot of exposed rock. You get a nice breeze in the evening that keeps the bugs away. Having the tent pad back in the trees a bit is good though.
schweady  
distinguished member(3965)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
Current Donor
04/23/2012 09:35PM
 
Flat, open expanses of rock for skywatching are a plus.



"You can observe a lot by watching." -- Yogi Berra
shoreviewswede  
distinguished member(685)distinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished memberdistinguished member
5 trip report(s) Photo Journal Past Donor Gear Reviews
04/24/2012 09:18AM
 
I guess my priorities are.
1. Good tent pads ... dry.
2. Wind (if the skitos are out, I want a breeze; if the breeze is 30mph, I want shelter)
3. Trees
4. Views


The only site I haven't enjoyed much was in a depressed area, and since it was raining we were dodging puddles.


Be Nice -Swede
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